Debunked : “To bit, or not to bit?”

Waarvoor ga je?
Met bit?
Welk soort bit?
Bitloos?
You choose.
Maar weet dan ook waarvòòr je kiest.
13 july 2014
“The iron has become, for man, some kind of indispensable attribute of the relationship, a magical key for control of the horse…’’
Alexander Nevzorov
The principle always remained the same, but the degree of cruelty varied.
A horse’s iron, roughly speaking is divided into two categories
– ‘’Trigeminal’’ action (when the branches of the trigeminus nerve, which pass along the horse’s jaw, are chosen as the main point of pain-infliction) and the
– ‘’Dental’’ effect, where the very tender toothless area- the bars, the teeth (first and second premolars), tongue, palate and gums are subjected to a direct painful influence- that is, direct pressure which acts upon nerves.
– Trigeminal action iron is based more on intimidation. The horse, being a phenomenally intelligent creature, always will remember what kind of ‘’mine’’ was put into her mouth by man. Such iron causes not a steady, cruel pain, but inflicts only one-time, short ‘’injections’’ of this pain into the horse’s brain and consciousness.
– Dental effect iron assumes constant usage of the rein, what now is called by the amusing phrase ‘’contact with the mouth’’- that is, these bits constantly remind the horse of her place and her servitude by inflicting continuous pain and discomfort.
It is difficult to say which type, the trigeminal or the dental is more cruel.
I believe that they are approximately equal in cruelty.
Any trigeminal iron provides a direct painful impact on the minor palatine nerve, the branches of the maxillary nerve, the sublingual and lingual nerves and the branches of the trigeminus nerve.
Any dental iron provides a direct painful impact to the minor palatine nerve, the branches of the maxillary nerve, the sublingual and lingual nerves and the alveolar and infraorbital nerves.
This is a dry anatomical fact.
There is no way around it.
A.N.

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